Breaking the Anxiety Cycle: Changing Behavior

                          Changing behaviors is all about noticing what you tend to do in anxiety provoking situations and learning to do something different. The more you can learn to tolerate anxiety provoking situations without avoiding or running from them, the less anxious you’ll be.…

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Breaking the Anxiety Cycle: Changing Thoughts

  To change your thoughts, you need to identify automatic thoughts and core beliefs. An automatic thought is what you say or think automatically like “that bee is going to sting me”. That thought alone doesn’t inevitably lead to anxious feelings and avoidance behaviors. You need to break your thought down and figure out what…

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Breaking the Anxiety Cycle

                                In a previous post we talked about the 3-Component Model which explains how your thoughts-feelings-behaviors work together to increase anxiety. The next few posts are about actively addressing the three components to help lessen anxiety. That means going all…

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My Anxiety is on Autopilot

You’ve probably had the experience of hopping in your car and suddenly you are at home without realizing how you got there. We call this autopilot and it’s kind of a surreal feeling. Rather than taking the autopilot route home could you have: evaluated traffic for a more efficient route? observed the scenery along your…

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Intentional use of Relaxation

Before we ease into relaxation mode, lets recap some basic anxiety information. When you feel anxious, it often means there is a perceived danger which leads to a  thought/feeling/behavior cycle known as the “3-Component Model”. Relaxation techniques are tools, not solutions Relaxation affects the feeling component (physical or emotional). Remember that relaxation is not a…

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Relaxation: Are you doing it wrong?

Just relax. It’s one of those mantras a lot of people with anxiety tell themselves, but is that always the best move? And does it work? If you experience anxiety, you likely perceive things as more dangerous (physically, emotionally, and/or mentally) than the average person. This causes your fight or flight system may “turn on”…

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Three Components Model of Anxiety

When you feel anxious it often means that there is a something in your environment that seems dangerous. That something (e.g., object, person, thought, or future event) is called a trigger. Triggers are connected to anxiety, but do not cause anxiety.  We know it is not causal because not everyone feels anxious when experiencing the…

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